All Flesh General History (1993 to 2000)

Musical History | July 28th, 2009

All Flesh has had three iterations: the original All Flesh from 1992 to 1996; All Flesh 2000 (when I relocated to Seattle); and the New Revelation of All Flesh from 2003 to 2006. This post reflect the first two versions of All Flesh.

The Beginning:

In 1991, I was the instigator of an audacious musical hybrid, an infusion of punk, metal and electronica with two other people. I was the “rivit head”, and there was a punk rocker and a metal-head (a page about that band is here) as well. This was long before Alian Jorgenson picked up a guitar — a radical idea, one that the other two members couldn’t embrace as freely as myself. It lasted just under a year.

It took me two years of study to turn me into the budding rock star I was destined to become, and in 1993, I formed all flesh, recorded a few demos, and played some shows at the local clubs. There’s more to tell about the whole thing, but I cannot; my head and heart is on a totally different place. I’ll let Rev. Wilhelm Fisk relate the history, from his own words from 2003, from the old all flesh website.

The following boxes reflect content from the first all flesh website design — my first — in 2003. Only the tables and fonts were modified to fit within this particular web design. The layout and text remain as they were originally written. –Billy ‘The Jack!’

Noise-13 and the
All Flesh Orchestra

1993 – 1997

Noise-13 (not pictured) uses digital instruments to create dark,
aggressive electro-industrial music,
structured over high velocity techno rhythms.

The charismatic Rev. Wilhelm Fisk writes lyrics that explore
the personal struggle between the spirit and the flesh
set in a backdrop of pre-millennial religious fervor.

(from a press release in 1996)

All Flesh has had many incarnations in its lifetime.

In 1993, All Flesh made it’s debut on the stage, with Rev. Wilhelm Fisk as the sole performer (as N-13 refused to play live, opting for an obscure presence instead, which N-13 maintained until a departure in 1996.)

The debut was innocuous but noteworthy in the fact that while Rev. Wilhelm Fisk couldn’t sing, (a fact he would readily admit,) he gained a quick following due to his intense performance and charismatic nature.

A demo recording ensued with the end result receiving tepid praise for the effort. Others maintained that there was a hint of promise—mainly those who had seen All Flesh perform their debut.

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